Thursday, November 29, 2007

Galinda

4 comments

Wikipedia:
Galinda, later Glinda, is Elphaba's roommate at Shiz University. She at first hates Elphaba as she sees her as a hindrance to her social climbing agenda. As she matures, she and Elphaba become close friends. It is implied as well that perhaps Galinda has feelings for Elphaba; indeed, she cares for her deeply, and Elphaba for her in return. However, the two are separated for fifteen years when Elphaba goes into hiding. Glinda is part of the high society in Gillikin, Oz's northern state. The Glinda in Wicked is parallel to The Glinda in The Wizard of Oz as she is seen as being snobby and inconsiderate but in The Wizard of Oz she is kind and gentle.

Me:

The Wikipedia synopsis needs re-written, but I'm busy with this. Galinda's childhood should be parallel to that of a young girl growing up in 19th-century South Carolina or Virginia. She has a wealthy family, but she is not of the highest class. She is more of the upper-middle class than the lower-upper class. I picture her childhood characterization to be somewhat brief, and possibly as chronological clips, showing her in a baby carriage with her parents talking about what a wonderful good little socialite she will be. Then a birthday party with a giant cake and a miniature version of her dress in the wizard of oz. A mountain of presents to rival Everest. I feel like going overboard with her and dealing with her childhood in hyperbole. I don't want her living in a mansion, just a large home with a big back yard, tree-shaded drive, and a giant oak tree next to a small pond. There should always be bright sunshine while outdoors, well-lit rooms while indoors, or if it needs to be dim for the setting, she should be emitting her own glow.

I want much of her role at Shiz to take parts from the book and the musical, because I feel the novel was a bit too dark throughout, and I want there to be a definite trend in Glinda's life from Galinda to Glinda, from sunshine to clouds. Her bubbly attitude can be drawn in from the musical to give a bit of light-heartedness to the beginning of the second part of the film. Her strength is her confidence, even when the odds are against her, and I would like to point out, often, that the world is much too big for her, but she still presses on without even batting an eyelash. This confidence is what allows her to do the things she does throughout school.

I like the idea that Galinda initially uses Elphaba as a pity-piece and makes herself the martyr of red-tape and unhappy circumstance. This 'taking lemons and making lemonade' approach is brilliant, and I think that taking it even farther and thinking that if she is never going to get a 'suitable' roommate, then she will make her roommate 'suitable' could be the motivation for continuing after Elphaba puts on the hat.

After she is friends with Elphaba, things could follow the book, and a few extra daily activities could be invented and inserted to demonstrate their friendship. This will also provide time to re-characterize Morrible and Grommetik into sinister, lurking beings. The issue that comes up should be the treatment of the Animals, and invented minor character should get into arguments over it. Possibly even a few Animals at Shiz should receive abuse to demonstrate the Wizard poisoning the minds of Ozians.

Eventually, when Dr. Dillamond is murdered and Elphaba eventually runs off to face-down the wizard, Glinda is determined to go with her and help. Their experience there will tear them apart, and Elphaba will leave her then.

She is a very amiable character, but she keeps her true-self to herself.

Two movies?

1 comments

The more I write this, the more I am convinced that it Wicked should be two movies, ending when Elphaba and Glinda part ways on the carriage. I think it would fit, and it would be sure to leave quite a large amount exciting material for the second movie, but my fear would be that the first movie may be too much exposition and characterization. It would, however, allow for my vision of giving equal time to each of the three witches, showing the childhood of the Thropp girls and Galinda, and how it created the characters they become at Shiz.

Perhaps the first movie would end as Glinda arrives back at school, alone, and we could see Nessa's heart breaking, falling into Nanny's arms. Each character could be affected by her flight. Glinda would then be totally alone, without a true friend left, and so she throws herself into magic studies. Nessa, angry at her sister, would grow bitter and recluse because of her feeling of natural superiority. Boq and his friends would split from the group, having been traumatized by the philosophy club and no longer having a link in Elphie. It could break off in a dramatic musical sequence without sound from the actors or scenes, just the tragic, heavy, dark music. Showing the beginning and end of Glinda's journey, from tears to stone-faced. Nessa's breakdown and temper tantrum, her first sign of true malice, anger, and violence. Boq and co. standing off to the side, confused, but not sure who to ask questions, and eventually they simply walk away. I picture it all in slow motion, of course. Nessa screaming, eyes shut from the force of her voice, Glinda glassy-eyed and far-away, walking away from the scene as a queen would from an execution, arms wrapped in a muff, and Boq shocked, then defeated, pacing off, head down. The camera pans upward towards the grim, cloudy sky, flies towards the cllouds, spins a bit, arrives at the emerald city once again, zooms past the buildings down to street-level, catches up to a figure in a pointed, black hat walking through the crowd, faster than those around her, pushing her way through, arms at her side. The camera slows from its super-fast travel speed as it approaches her. The world comes back to speed, she takes a half-dozen steps, breaks through the front of the crowd, turns right into an alley, and the second she is out of sight around the corner, the screen goes black and the music silent.

I know having the ending set without the rest of the movie is kind of strange, but I'm one for drama, and I think this is nice. What does everyone else think of it?

Grommetik

1 comments

Wikipedia:
Grommetik is a tik-tok creature, servant to Madame Morrible. It is strongly implied he is involved in a sinister plot orchestrated at least in part by her. From what is described in the novel, it is similar to Tik-Tok from Baum's original Oz series.

Me:
I'd like to make Grommetik seem kind of cute and clumsy in the beginning of the movie, sort of in the same way Morrible seems nice to a fault. I want both of the characters to evolve in the audience's mind in the same way, from benign, even comical, to conniving, loathsome, and sinister. He should make random appearances and sort of POP out of no where on some errand or another, but always running into the witches or other protagonists. Occasionally he should scare the audience, once or twice when tension is somewhat high, and after the audience begins to suspect that Morrible and Grommetik are not all they seem. He can become a bit of an object of fear, or a harbinger of death that sometimes does the dirty work for its master. He shouldn't be liked, even a little bit, and the noise he makes should seem playful at first, but the whirring of gears, popping of steam, and grinding of metal should become more shrill and ominous by the end of Elphaba's stay at Shiz.

Liir

1 comments

Wikipedia:
Liir is a boy who leaves the mauntery with Elphaba for the Vinkus. It is strongly implied that Liir is the son of Elphaba and Fiyero. She does indeed admit that there is a year of her life she does not remember, during which she could have bore Liir. Extremely chubby, Liir played with his supposed half-siblings while he and his mother stayed with Fiyero's widow. He is also the protagonist of Maguire's sequel to Wicked, Son of a Witch In Son of a Witch, Liir gets Candle pregnant and she has a green baby. This proves once and for all that Liir is Elphaba's son. Gregory Maguire has described Liir as "Elphaba's son" in interviews.

Me:
He is Elphaba's son, and he would be the connection to any kind of a sequel, but I think that his role should be very much in the background, and we should spend much more time introducing Elphaba's pets than Liir. He should just be there by her side, almost like a familiar, and she should never call him 'son' or be motherly at all. The audience should be able to figure out that he is her son, but end up being surprised at how little they care about him. Now, I haven't read Son of a Witch yet, and so I do not know how much this has to do with it, but I cold guess that since we didn't get a whole lot of characterization of Liir in the first book we didn't really care as much about him in the second book. This may have contributed to why it did not receive the rave reviews of the first. Perhaps a bit more time should be spent on him, or perhaps creating a sense of mystery about him with many open ended questions to create suspense and desire to see a sequel featuring the boy. I would need to read the second book to really decide on what his role should be.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

Madame Morrible

1 comments

Wikipedia:
Madame Morrible is the headmistress of Elphaba and Galinda's college (Crage Hall) in Shiz. She is suspected by Elphaba and her friends to be responsible for the murder of Dr. Dillamond. At one point, she proposes that Elphaba, Galinda, and Nessarose become future behind-the-scenes rulers in Oz, a proposal which they never willingly follow. Elphaba suspects that Madame Morrible has at least some magical powers and may have indeed controlled the fates of the three women. It is possible that she spies on Elphaba and sends messages to Liir through the Carp in the well at Elphaba's home in the Vinkus; the Carp dies at about the same time as Morrible. Morrible dies of natural causes minutes before Elphaba attempts to murder her.

Me:
This role is HUGE! She is the second biggest villain in the book, but she has the most air-time. I picture either an exceedingly proper woman, like Judi Dench can play, or a comically bumbling (yet somehow effective) leader. The first role may fit better with the tone, especially if she puts on a very false air of joviality. Perhaps a character like Dolores Umbridge in Harry Potter 5. Total witch, but has pictures of kitties and a laugh like a seven-year old. However she is cast, this woman is evil. She is totally bent on making the wizard Numero Uno, and on keeping his totalitarian regime in tact. She should laugh as she dies, seeing Elphaba coming to kill her, knowing that she will be dead before the witch gets to her. I want her to be powerful, but no one really realize it until it is too late. I want her prediction/request to come true, just in a slightly different way.

The three witches should have their titles/positions because of the influence of Morrible. Glinda will follow most closely, and will rise through the ranks of society using her magic and social talents in the North. Nessa, although requested to be in the South, ends up in the East where Elphaba was requested. Nessa becomes exactly what Morrible wants of her, the Bitch of the East and keeps the Munchkinlanders in line until her death. Elphaba's resistance of Morrible's magic helps her escape to the West with the Winkies. She hides there for some time, but eventually comes back because of Morrible. Really, the only thing that keeps her prediction from working is the arrival of the tornado, and the house that kills Nessa. Morrible will do much to alter the history of Oz, but she will be behind the scenes, rather than the head like the Wizard.

Melena

0 comments

Wikipedia:
Melena is Elphaba, Nessarose, and Shell's mother, and comes from a high class family. She has mostly pagan traditions, which contradicts Frex's statements. She has very loose morals, and dreams of her days as a pampered girl, despite her rebelling against it at the time. She has a taste for alcohol and pinlobble leaves.

Me:
I think that it is VERY important to remember just how high-class she was. Her fall from grace should be so distinct and visible that the audience should feel embarrassed for young Elphaba that she should have such a ridiculous mother (even before she could talk or realize her situation). I picture her FAT, but not obese, just simply round, large chested, obviously once beautiful, but no longer. There should be something about her that references who she used to be. Maybe a hat, piece of jewelry, pair of shoes, or something that she has on or does, that is so different from the rest of her that we notice and realize she is still holding on to that old life. Maybe Frex mentions it, askingg her why she keeps that silly thing. Maybe a comb. I think that would be wonderful! A beautiful jeweled comb from her mother. She could comb her gnarled, dirty, split-end hair... staring at herself in the mirror, drunk and high. Finally, one day after Nessa is born (maybe before, but the timing is important) she will break the comb on a tangle. Stare at it. Place it down. Pick up a simple wooden comb and continue brushing, unblinking.

I like that scene!!!!

Nanny

1 comments

Wikipedia:
Nanny is a member of the Thropp family, though whether by blood or employment is never explicitly revealed. By the conclusion of the book, she has raised three generations of the Thropps, most notably having acted as chaperon to Nessarose, Elphaba and Glinda during their years at Shiz. She is still vital well into her eighties. Her attitude reflects this, as she is stoic, speaks her mind, and holds to somewhat inflammatory 'Lurlinistic' pagan beliefs.

Me:
She is such an interesting character. She is constantly complaining, yet keeps on working. Her strong will, which is so prevalent in the beginning, seems, later, to be subdued, if not controlled by Nessa. Nanny allows this because she feels bad for Nessa, and eventually just gives in completely. I think this should be a testament to the strong will of Nessa or at least her ability to get others to do what she wants. Nanny, who nearly ran their mother's life, was almost a slave to Nessa. Her role is not huge, and so I think it would be a wonderful opportunity to use her attitude and personality to make a point. She should be overly loud and obnoxious to begin with, and then overly subdued to Nessa towards the end of her part.

Nessarose

2 comments

Wikipedia:
Nessarose is Elphaba's sister. She eventually inherits the position of Eminent Thropp, leader of the state of Munchkinland. Through this position, she coerces Munchkinland into seceding from Oz. As a political leader of Munchkinland, she has both supporters and detractors. Her unhappy subjects nickname her "the Wicked Witch of the East." Nessarose is also the apple of her father Frexspar's (Frex) eye, and his most favored child out of three. She was born without arms, possibly as a result of her mother's attempts to prevent another green child, and the multi-hued glass shoes are charmed by Glinda to help her to become more independent.

Me:
She is horribly neglected in this story, both versions in my opinion. Nessa plays such a LARGE role in pushing Elphaba over the edge into near-insanity, both intentionally and unintentionally. Elphaba's obsession over gaining her father's love, and inability to do so, are what make her do the things she does in the end and live up to the title of Wicked. Nessa was her sister who her father actually DID love. Elphaba had to have a love-hate relationship with her from the beginning. I feel Nessa's attitude towards her sister, and the fact that she was 'wicked' long before Elphie, merit her more than the part she was given in either story. Nessarose needs to be as well-developed of a character as both her sister and Glinda, and Nessa's rise to power to be what pushes Elphaba and Glinda towards their positions in the West and North. I like her not having arms better than being in a wheel-chair. This can be accomplished on film much more effectively than on stage. I feel it adds to her character that, despite being born with a disfiguring defect (one that most would consider unattractive), she was horribly vain and effected such an air of grace and self-importance that her fall into evil should feel more inevitable than a shock or change of character. The ability to move, granted her by the magic in the shoes from Glinda, and her position of power as the Imminent Thropp are what allow her true character to come out, and Elphaba's prediction of her being called the 'Bitch of the East' coming to fruition. This is neglected, and I want more of it.

The Wizard

0 comments

Wikipedia:
The Wizard is the dictator of Oz and primary villain of the story. He originally came to Oz from Earth in a hot air balloon seeking the Grimmerie, but became sidetracked when he discovered he could orchestrate a coup in Oz. It is heavily implied that he fathered Elphaba while her mother was under the influence of the Magical Elixir, which may explain Elphaba's green skin, aversion to water, and ability to occasionally read parts of the Grimmerie, which originated in the Wizard's world. After Elphaba's death and Dorothy's return to the Emerald City, the Wizard hastily leaves Oz for America in another (or the same) hot air balloon, and plans his suicide. After taking the Magical Elixir herself, Elphaba sees visions of the future, in which the Wizard fails to drown himself in the ocean. This is consistent with Baum's books, in which the Wizard later returns to Oz, alive. She also sees a sign in a shop window that says "Irish need not apply", hinting, that much like Elphaba, The Wizard faced prejudice.

Me:
I like this, but I don't think the fact that he is her father should be revealed until the end. He father should be a mystery, but it would be a great ending to have her father revealed as the wizard, further driving the stake into her heart. I like the ending where he leaves and tries to commit suicide, but fails, however this may draw too much sympathy. The wizard is too beloved a character from the Oz story/movie, and so I like the fact that he is a dictator over Oz in this story. It works for me better to have him escape and try to go back to life in the real world with the same prejudice he forced on the Animals. Divine Justice. His fate is up for grabs, however.

Turtle Heart

0 comments

Wikipedia:
Turtle Heart is a wandering glassblower from Quadling country. He comes upon Melena's home while Frex is out preaching. Melena and Turtle Heart have an extended affair, and it is suggested that Frex may have had intimate relations with him, as well. It is also strongly suggested that he is the father of Nessarose.

Me:
I want to go beyond the book with Turtle Heart. He is such a great character, and he really embodies the dysfunction rampant in Elphaba's family during her childhood. I don't want to just suggest that Turtle Heart is Nessarose's father, but I want to SUGGEST that he is her father. I want to show the affair with Melena AND Frexspar. I want to even go as far as to show that Turtle Heart was the only one who really showed any love towards Elphaba, and then link the glass he gave her to that in the end of the movie. His death needs to be traumatic for the audience; at least enough to explain why both Frex and Melena just shut down after he dies.
I like the parallels I've heard drawn between his death and the way that Nessa later allows Munchkinland to operate with animal and human sacrifices.

This may not be possible because most of the movie will need to be focused on how the three witches interact with each other, and if too much time is spent on Elphaba and Nessa’s childhoods, then there won’t be any time left for that.

Yackle

0 comments

Wikipedia:
Yackle is a mysterious crone who appears frequently in Elphaba's life and who Elphaba suspects may be exerting control over her fate and be Kumbrica, the ambivalent goddess of Ozian myth. She is first mentioned by Nanny as an old gypsy woman from whom she bought the medicine which would stop Melena's second child being born green. Later, she appears as an old woman guarding the door to the Philosophy Club and later still, she appears as Mother Yackle, a maunt (a sort of Ozian nun) at the mauntery (a unionist nunnery) who takes care of the homeless Elphaba. She is also believed to be one of the reincarnation of the Kumbricia Witch who protects Elphaba as she is the second incarnation.

Me:
I feel she should be a very mysterious character, but not a huge role, possibly just an introduced character and then simply a recurring face to make one wonder

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Characters

0 comments

My character list is very important. It will define much of the direction of the film, and as such, it will be a work in progress. To start, I will use Wikipedia's version of the characters, and I will have a small synopsis of how I want that character to be different.

Wikipedia synopsis:

  • Elphaba is the protagonist of the story, who eventually becomes known as the Wicked Witch of the West. She acquires this nickname more as a result of her sister's nickname (the Wicked Witch of the East, who was so named by her political opponents) than for any wicked deeds. Wicked adds details regarding the social and political climate of Oz which make Elphaba a more sympathetic character. She is driven into conflict with The Wizard out of concern for the welfare of sentient and linguistically adept Animals who are suffering under the discriminatory and increasingly genocidal policies of The Wizard. Dorothy unwittingly becomes embroiled in the conflict after her house kills Elphaba's sister Nessarose; Glinda gives Dorothy Nessarose's famously magical shoes, which Elphaba fears may cause immense harm if they fall into the hands of the Wizard. Elphaba's name comes from sounding out Oz author L. Frank Baum's initials, "LFB". She is allergic to water which causes her to clean herself with oil instead.
  • Nessarose is Elphaba's sister. She eventually inherits the position of Eminent Thropp, leader of the state of Munchkinland. Through this position, she coerces Munchkinland into seceding from Oz. As a political leader of Munchkinland, she has both supporters and detractors. Her unhappy subjects nickname her "the Wicked Witch of the East." Nessarose is also the apple of her father Frexspar's (Frex) eye, and his most favored child out of three. She was born without arms, possibly as a result of her mother's attempts to prevent another green child, and the multi-hued glass shoes are charmed by Glinda to help her to become more independent.
  • Galinda, later Glinda, is Elphaba's roommate at Shiz University. She at first hates Elphaba as she sees her as a hindrance to her social climbing agenda. As she matures, she and Elphaba become close friends. It is implied as well that perhaps Galinda has feelings for Elphaba; indeed, she cares for her deeply, and Elphaba for her in return. However, the two are separated for fifteen years when Elphaba goes into hiding. Glinda is part of the high society in Gillikin, Oz's northern state. The Glinda in Wicked is parallel to The Glinda in The Wizard of Oz as she is seen as being snobby and inconsiderate but in The Wizard of Oz she is kind and gentle
  • Fiyero is a prince of the Winkies. He meets Elphaba at Shiz, and later has an affair with her while she is involved in a resistance movement against the Wizard of Oz. This leads to his murder by the Gale Force, the Wizard's secret police. Elphaba and Liir later take residence in Fiyero's widow's home, Kiamo Ko.
  • The Wizard is the dictator of Oz and primary villain of the story. He originally came to Oz from Earth in a hot air balloon seeking the Grimmerie, but became sidetracked when he discovered he could orchestrate a coup in Oz. It is heavily implied that he fathered Elphaba while her mother was under the influence of the Magical Elixir, which may explain Elphaba's green skin, aversion to water, and ability to occasionally read parts of the Grimmerie, which originated in the Wizard's world. After Elphaba's death and Dorothy's return to the Emerald City, the Wizard hastily leaves Oz for America in another (or the same) hot air balloon, and plans his suicide. After taking the Magical Elixir herself, Elphaba sees visions of the future, in which the Wizard fails to drown himself in the ocean. This is consistent with Baum's books, in which the Wizard later returns to Oz, alive. She also sees a sign in a shop window that says "Irish need not apply", hinting, that much like Elphaba, The Wizard faced prejudice.
  • Madame Morrible is the headmistress of Elphaba and Galinda's college (Crage Hall) in Shiz. She is suspected by Elphaba and her friends to be responsible for the murder of Dr. Dillamond. At one point, she proposes that Elphaba, Galinda, and Nessarose become future behind-the-scenes rulers in Oz, a proposal which they never willingly follow. Elphaba suspects that Madame Morrible has at least some magical powers and may have indeed controlled the fates of the three women. It is possible that she spies on Elphaba and sends messages to Liir through the Carp in the well at Elphaba's home in the Vinkus; the Carp dies at about the same time as Morrible. Morrible dies of natural causes minutes before Elphaba attempts to murder her.
  • Doctor Dillamond is a talking Goat and professor at Crage Hall in Shiz. Assisted by Elphaba, Dr. Dillamond performs research on the differences between animals and Animals (sentient animals). He suspiciously dies from a slit throat; Madame Morrible claims that this is an accident, but her account is contradicted by Galinda’s Ama (chaperon), Ama Clutch, who claims she witnessed the event.
  • Boq is a Munchkin who grew up with Elphaba and reunites with her at Shiz University. At first, he is only interested in talking to Elphaba in the hope that it will help his crush, Galinda, notice him. However, over time Boq and Elphaba become close friends and help Dr. Dillamond with his research, along with his college mates Crope and Tibbett. Later in life, Elphaba meets Boq while she is on the hunt for Dorothy along the Yellow Brick Road. He is now married to Milla, one of Glinda's friends from the University and has many children.
  • Dorothy Gale is a 12 year-old girl who lands in Oz in her house, which crushes Nessarose. She takes Nessarose's shoes under the advice of Glinda. These shoes are seen by many as a symbol of power over Munchkinland. During her travels, many citizens of Oz are superstitious about her because of these shoes and her name. Her first name sounds like a reversal of the name of the "king" of her land (Theodore Roosevelt). Because her name means "Goddess of Gifts" (the opposite of Theodore, "Gift of God"), it is implied that Dorothy may be the second coming of Lurline, who was also known by that title. The Gale Force fear her for her last name. The Wizard sends Dorothy to kill Elphaba, but Dorothy's intention is to ask her for forgiveness for killing Nessarose. Elphaba does not know whether to treat Dorothy with kindness or to fear her. Dorothy accidentally kills Elphaba by pouring water on her in an attempt to put out a fire on Elphaba's dress.
  • Liir is a boy who leaves the mauntery with Elphaba for the Vinkus. It is strongly implied that Liir is the son of Elphaba and Fiyero. She does indeed admit that there is a year of her life she does not remember, during which she could have bore Liir. Extremely chubby, Liir played with his supposed half-siblings while he and his mother stayed with Fiyero's widow. He is also the protagonist of Maguire's sequel to Wicked, Son of a Witch In Son of a Witch, Liir gets Candle pregnant and she has a green baby. This proves once and for all that Liir is Elphaba's son. Gregory Maguire has described Liir as "Elphaba's son" in interviews.
  • Yackle is a mysterious crone who appears frequently in Elphaba's life and who Elphaba suspects may be exerting control over her fate and be Kumbrica, the ambivalent goddess of Ozian myth. She is first mentioned by Nanny as an old gypsy woman from whom she bought the medicine which would stop Melena's second child being born green. Later, she appears as an old woman guarding the door to the Philosophy Club and later still, she appears as Mother Yackle, a maunt (a sort of Ozian nun) at the mauntery (a unionist nunnery) who takes care of the homeless Elphaba. She is also believed to be one of the reincarnation of the Kumbricia Witch who protects Elphaba as she is the second incarnation.
  • The dwarf claims to be an immortal sent to Oz to prevent the Grimmerie from returning to Earth. With his Clock of the Time Dragon, he seems to Elphaba to either be able to control fate or predict it.
  • Grommetik is a tik-tok creature, servant to Madame Morrible. It is strongly implied he is involved in a sinister plot orchestrated at least in part by her. From what is described in the novel, it is similar to Tik-Tok from Baum's original Oz series.
  • Nanny is a member of the Thropp family, though whether by blood or employment is never explicitly revealed. By the conclusion of the book, she has raised three generations of the Thropps, most notably having acted as chaperon to Nessarose, Elphaba and Glinda during their years at Shiz. She is still vital well into her eighties. Her attitude reflects this, as she is stoic, speaks her mind, and holds to somewhat inflammatory 'Lurlinistic' pagan beliefs.
  • Frexspar is Elphaba, Nessarose, and Shell's father (at least in the emotional and physical sense; there are questions of whether he shares biology with some of the children). Frex is a devout Unionist priest. Nessarose was his favorite child, and to her he gave the famous jeweled slippers.
  • Chistery, Killyjoy, the Bees, and the Crows are the animals which accompany Elphaba on the way to Kiamo Ko by coach which also become her familiars. The Bees are taken along as a source of honey for the travelers, and it is suggested that through dormant magical talent, Elphaba unconsciously sets them upon the coach cook, whom she dislikes and is later found stung to death at the edge of a cliff. Killyjoy, the cook's dog, takes an instant liking to Liir, who decides to keep him. The Crows are given to Elphaba by Princess Nastoya, who then specifically states that Elphaba is to send them to her if she needs help with anything. Princess Nastoya also tells Elphaba directly that they are to be her familiars. On the way to Kiamo Ko, they run across Chistery, an abandoned infant snow monkey, whom Elphaba rescues through another unconscious act of magic (creating ice under her feet as she runs across a pond to save him from Killyjoy). Later in the book he is taught by Elphaba to speak in hopes of completing Dr. Dillamond's study of how all life is connected. However, he only manages to mimic what others say, although he gains the ability to speak in full, comprehensible sentences in Son of a Witch. Elphaba sews wings onto the backs of him and the other monkeys, in a combination of Doctor Dillamond's studies and her practice of magic.
  • Melena is Elphaba, Nessarose, and Shell's mother, and comes from a high class family. She has mostly pagan traditions, which contradicts Frex's statements. She has very loose morals, and dreams of her days as a pampered girl, despite her rebelling against it at the time. She has a taste for alcohol and pinlobble leaves.
  • Avaric is a friend of Boq's, and Galinda's. He is described as being the "perfect asshole". Late in the novel, Elphaba visits him, and they have a discussion about evil with some of his friends.
  • Crope and Tibbett are boys who attend Shiz University along with Boq. They later become members of the main group of friends that features in the first part of the book. It is heavily suggested that the two are homosexual; however, it is never explicitly proven, only through sexual comments passed by the two about each other or other boys. While Crope eventually becomes a sort of valet for 'Lady Glinda', Tibbet goes mad from his experiences at the Philosophy Club (being publicly raped by a Tiger) and later dies under Elphaba's care while she is at the mauntery.
  • Turtle Heart is a wandering glassblower from Quadling country. He comes upon Melena's home while Frex is out preaching. Melena and Turtle Heart have an extended affair, and it is suggested that Frex may have had intimate relations with him, as well. It is also strongly suggested that he is the father of Nessarose.
  • Ama Clutch is Galinda’s caretaker at Shiz. She is present throughout Galinda and Elphaba's time at Shiz. Ama Clutch "loses" her sanity in a suspicious way when she witnesses the murder of Doctor Dillamond. It is strongly suggested that Ama Clutch was hexed by Madame Morrible in the specific way that Galinda initially lied about upon her arrival to Shiz (in an effort to get a private room), talking to inanimate objects as if they were people.

My view:

  • Elphaba: This is a good synopsis, and so I will leave it very much at that. I do wish to note, however, that I feel there is a bit of characterization that is left out for poor Elphie. She seems so distant and aloof in the novel sometimes, and I feel that is one thing the musical achieved very well: making Elphaba human. She feels so much more like one of us in the musical, and I attribute a good part of its success to this. Wicked, the novel, can sometimes feel a bit like a biography, which often detach themselves from emotion and deal strictly with fact. I prefer the book's version of Elphaba to the musical's, but I feel some lessons can be learned from the latter.
  • Galinda (Glinda): I enjoy thinking of Glinda and Galinda almost as two separate characters, and that name change is, to me, much more than simply just a tribute to the Goat, but blatant symbolism. Galinda, the upper-middle/lower-upper class debutante socialite is destroyed by the death of Doctor Dillamond, and Glinda, the hollow, face-value, all about appearances, wizard of both magical AND societal methods arises from her ashes. The novel is mostly focussed on Elphaba, it was written with her in mind, and as a commentary of the nature of good and evil itself. The musical brings in the character of Glinda in a very real way, and I feel that is an important step towards making this film, and I will explain why in my analysis of the next character. I feel Glinda needs to be two people: the very definition of "goodness" on the surface, but just as selfish and manipulative as Elphaba and Nessa underneath, using her magic and abilities in society to hide her true motives.
  • Nessarose: She is horribly neglected in this story, both versions in my opinion. Nessa plays such a LARGE role in pushing Elphaba over the edge into near-insanity, both intentionally and unintentionally. Elphaba's obsession over gaining her father's love, and inability to do so, are what make her do the things she does in the end and live up to the title of Wicked. Nessa was her sister who her father actually DID love. Elphaba had to have a love-hate relationship with her from the beginning. I feel Nessa's attitude towards her sister, and the fact that she was 'wicked' long before Elphie, merit her more than the part she was given in either story. Nessarose needs to be as well-developed of a character as both her sister and Glinda, and Nessa's rise to power to be what pushes Elphaba and Glinda towards their positions in the West and North. I like her not having arms better than being in a wheel-chair. This can be accomplished on film much more effectively than on stage. I feel it adds to her character that, despite being born with a disfiguring defect (one that most would consider unattractive), she was horribly vain and effected such an air of grace and self-importance that her fall into evil should feel more inevitable than a shock or change of character. The ability to move, granted her by the magic in the shoes from Glinda, and her position of power as the Imminent Thropp are what allow her true character to come out, and Elphaba's prediction of her being called the 'Bitch of the East' coming to fruition. This is neglected, and I want more of it.
  • Madame Morrible: Coming Later

My ambition and hope for this blog...

2 comments

Hello all! This is one of several blogs that I have started, and all of my prior attempts have fizzled out fairly quickly, mostly because I simply did not have the time to make the daily updates that I promised; my schedule was too unpredictable...

This one, however, will be different... I am telling you all now that I most definitely will NOT be posting every day.

Instead it will get done when I have time, and so I think this will help me stay motivated and connected.


So, enough of that.


I am creating this blog to try and get some sort of a screenplay (however informal) together for a possible adaptation of the novel Wicked: The Life and Times of The Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire. Many will know this popular book, and many will know it as the phenomenally successful musical screenplay simply known as Wicked.

I enjoyed the book throughly, having read it before hearing of the musical, and now that I know every word to every song of the Broadway production I love it even more.

I want there to be a movie, and I know that many people do as well, but many are very afraid of what may appear on screen, and I feel that this has hampered the effort. Fear of the movie ruining the book, as so many movies do, has kept fans at bay and stifled the calls for a motion picture version of the epic.


I want to know what people want to see in the movie. I know what I want to see, and I will be writing my portion according to that, but I want others to express and discuss their own opinions of what is important to the film and what should be done differently.

I know that blogs do not gain instant popularity by simply existing, and one must exist for some time before it can gain any kind of a following, let alone a readership or list of contributors, so I will be spending a great deal of time writing my version of the story and how I want to see it on screen.

This process will most likely take months, and with regular posts I should gain attention somewhere. Hopefully someone will see my page and feel strongly enough about something that I have written to comment.

This is not a business venture for me, simply a passion. I want to see this happen, and hopefully it will.


My first synopsis begins today, in my next post, with the characters.